Thousands of locals can’t even think straight as they go into the second year of the “Maduro diet” and are forced to find ANYTHING they can to eat. People are even eating their pets and protected wildlife such as flamingos. In South America as well as the United States, it is actually illegal to hunt and kill the rare pink birds because they are considered a protected animal by the government, according to the Miami Herald.

Scientists and investigators from Zulia University, a school located in Maracaibo, Venezuela have discovered over 20 bird carcasses with their breast and torsos removed since last November. The unfortunate finding have led biologists to believe that the birds are being eaten by human beings.

But these swan like figures aren’t the only animals. Reports have surfaced that dogs, cats and donkeys are being eaten too.

 

Robert Linares, a Maracaibo west disposal worker told the Miami Herald that, “Sometimes we only find the animal’s heads, guts and legs. We used to see this very little in the past, but this practice is now out of control and on the rise.”

As of now, global religious and political leaders have expressed grave concern over the corruption and control of food by President Maduro and his military.

New reports shared have stated that on average citizens have lost 19 pounds in 2016.

In addition to that, a whooping 82 percent that live below the poverty line in the country have most likely lost more due to the “Maduro diet,” Fox news said.

 

Even as millions suffer and are forced to flee their homeland on boats and by foot, many within the nation’s national military forces are enjoying life and making mounds of money from the tragedy.

Last year, reports surfaced that the starving people are going to extreme measures to purchase food, even doing so in the middle of the night in illegal markets at ridiculously high prices. Many of which are run by the military.

 

Now, it is believed that, “Food is a Better Business than Drugs”

Also sources have stated that the government is hoarding food that’s imported and concealing it by the pound in ports, so they can sell it and turn it over for a high profit.

So what’s next for the people of Venezuela? Nobody knows for sure, but the harsh regulations being handed to President Maduro and the loss of trade partners with countries like the United States will hopefully make him rethink his current strategy.