This U.S. has seen 5,000+ reports of wind damage, large hail and tornadoes so far in 2017.

The U.S. has endured a destructive start to 2017 from the multiple severe weather outbreaks since January.

There have been 5,372 preliminary reports of severe weather across the United States in 2017 through April 8, according to NOAA’s Storm Prediction Center (SPC). That figure includes reports of tornadoes, large hail and wind damage.

This is more than than double the average of 2,274 for the same period of time during the past 10 years (2007-2016). In that decade, only 2008 had about the same number of severe weather reports by this point in the year with 5,242.

The animation below shows how the occurrences of wind damage, large hail and tornadoes have piled up month-by-month this year. Portions of the South have been hit the hardest, but the Midwest has also seen a high concentration of severe weather reports.

Wind damage has accounted for about 61 percent of the 5,372 severe weather reports, followed by large hail with 29 percent and tornadoes at 10 percent.

Seventy-one of 100 days have featured one or more reports of severe weather from Jan. 1-April 10, according to SPC’s database. Monday marked the 26th consecutive day with at least one severe thunderstorm report logged in the U.S.

Seven states have yet to see a report of severe weather in 2017: Alaska, Connecticut, Hawaii, Maine, Rhode Island, South Dakota and Vermont.

Severe thunderstorms are largely responsible for the record number of U.S. billion-dollar weather-related disasters in the first three months of 2017. Three separate severe weather outbreaks have caused damage of a billion dollars or more, NOAA says. READ MORE